武楽とは

With a theme of "beauty of martial-arts" lying underneath, Bugaku is a dynamic and stylish performing arts that combines traditional musical instruments with various performances and dances of martial arts. Those musical instruments include biwa (Japanese lute), hand drums, nokan (flute), Shinto flute and Japanese drums.

Budo and Bujutsu is somewhat a symbolism of Japan that cannot go without being discussed when speaking of Japan. Starting with Sumo, the national sport of Japan, and Judo, an Olympic sport, there is kenjutsu, jujutsu, karate, aikido, kobujutsu and the martial-arts boom nowadays.
The skills, form, timing, courtesy, spirit, the beauty within the physical maneuvers, and then the beauty found in swords, armors, and battle outfits, the functional beauty, the aesthetics of samurai, etc...

Bugaku is a Kabugeki of dynamic dance and valiant music that is orchestrated as a composite art of a new art movement called the "martial-arts campaign" proposed from a viewpoint of "beauty of martial-arts" by Koushiro Minamoto.

Currently, there are common dance plays in Japanese martial-arts and traditional performing arts such as the Nanba movement which is attracting some attention from various fields.
Bugaku is an art that restructures the intrinsic value of refined theory of technique for protecting something important at the risk of one’s life.

Also, Bugaku is not only tied to ancient traditions or traditional instruments but also incorporates Chinese martial-arts, Tae Kwon Do, and the latest acrobatic martial-arts such as XMA (extreme martial-arts), as well as the Idaki, the world’s oldest wind instrument legacy from Australia, which is used to communicate with the spirits.

By combining these kinds of traditional Japanese martial-arts and music with the modern martial-arts and overseas folk instruments, we see a potential of a new culture.


 【about Bugaku】PV(Interview of Minamoto Koshiro) watch movie
【武楽とは】PV(源光士郎インタビュー

■さまざまな分野で活躍する方々をシブテレ編集部がインタビューする「People」のコーナーでも、武楽座座長 源光士郎が紹介されています。


I have originated a new style of Japanese traditional dance art “BUGAKU”.
BUGKAU is constituted from theories of three main Japanese traditional arts.
Firstly, a theory of Japanese martial art BUJUTSU; such as Iaido (skill of a quick sword drawing), Kenjustu (Japanese swordsmanship),Boujutsu (stick fighting) and Naginata (a halberd-like weapon). Secondly, traditional Japanese masked dance-drama paly NOH and thirdly a traditional Japanese music style WAGAKU.

BUGAKU is a challenge to open a new frontier to Japanese traditional dance play.

Martial art and Japanese traditional dance play have a lot of similarities. Both traditional Japanese dance play and martial art have perfected movements. Each action has its own reason for existence and movement is refined to its simplest form to maintain a perfect balance to give best effect.
Stillness and motion, motion to stillness. When the tension of antagonistic forces reaches to its highest level, the power explodes from static to dynamic. The action throb our heart and it conjures unheard music dwells in our body, it is an art of movement more than anything.

I consider NOH’s interpretation of the world and motion technique accompanied by WAGAKU sounds, that leads already perfected beautility of BUJUTSU to a new level.

The world interpretation of NOH is to “encounter with subtle and profound beauty”.

Yashima (eight Islands) is one example of such an encounter.
This is known as one of the best play written by Yoami (Japanese play writer and composer) with finest music of his work. The play is about woes of dead samurai warriors. Those samurai warriors have fall into hell of eternal fights, from what they have done during their life.

A traveling priest (Waki : a supporting cast) from capital met a mysterious old fisherman(Mae Shite: pre-form of the main character), who hinted himself to be an embodiment of a dead war lord Yoshitsune and disappeared. The old fishermen came into the priest’s dream on that night. In that dream, the old fisherman appeared as Yoshitsune himself (Nochi-Shite: transformed form of the main character), wearing a suit of armor and looked dignified. Yoshitsune showed the scene of Yumi-nagashi, which was about him fighting to protect his name and bravery. Then Yoshitsune showed his eternal fight still going on against Taira-no- Noritsune ( the protector of Noto area in Japan) and then the ghost of Yoshitsune blended into a morning storm from a dream.

In order to show the difference between the real world and spiritual world, A traveling priest (Waki : a supporting cast) would not wear a MEN (a mask) but the inhabitance of the spiritual world, Yoshitsune (Shite: Main character) would wear a MEN (a mask) to express the subtle and profound beauty away from humanly world.

This world of subtle and profound beauty is created by NOH movements called HAKOBI. HAKOBI is coming from Japanese word HAKOBU which means “to carry”. NOH movement HAKOBI stands for distinctive NOH walk, it is so called because we “carry” the mask. The world of NOH is heavily dependent on way they move the masks. The mask conjures the sense of subtle and profound beauty such as divinity and mysteriousness. However, if the masked actor moved it in an offhand manner, all sacredness disappears right away. The angling of a mask is very important. That is why NOH require dignified movements HAKOBI.

HAKOBI also exists in BUJITSU (Japanese martial art).
Contrary to KSBUKI, NOH never emits energy outwards, it always draws energy towards the actor himself. For example you can see that from hands movement. In KABUKI, you can see actors occasionally open their hands towards the audience during an act. On the other hand in NOH, actors always show the back of their hands to the audience. The rule limits the movement but it gives an order to the dance. Move, hold, hold and move. The particular limitation of movements draws the audience into a sacred moment.

It also happens in martial arts. When two people are fighting, there is a moment the concentration and tension reaches to the maximum level and the skill of two people balances out. Whatever they do, they know each move will be countered by the other. Only very little they can do and there will be a moment of silence. Each small holy moment of silences, they look for chance to move, the silence is the precast to the next movement towards the end.

WAGAKU perfectly conjures that holy moment into the air with the sound.
WAGAKU is an indispensable partner to Bugaku, because unlike western style music, WAGAKU considers “silence” between each sound is also a part of melody.

BUGAKU is obviously not only dependent on tranquil sounds. In order to express a beauty of the energy flare emitted by the motion change from static to dynamic, BUGAKU has to have both characteristics in accompanied music. While taking into consideration of other music, including Kagura (Shinto music and dance numbers), Gagaku (Ancient Japanese court dance and music), NOH, KABUKI, BUGAKU also taking in valiant sound essence from Satsuma biwa (Satuma lute ), graceful sound essence from Chikuzen biwa (chikuzen lute). Finally quite different from NOH and KABUKI, BUGAKU adopted vigorous beat of Wadaiko (Japanese traditional drum) as well.

BUGAKU is a heightened stylistic beauty within the moment of silence before the action. It embraces NOH interpretation of the world, movement accords with WAGAKU essence to express beauty and holiness dwells with in BUJUTSU.

A legendary Japanese film director Akira Kurosawa was the master of this “moment of silence” before the action. He expressed this stylistic beauty in moment of silence with a film called “Tsubaki san ju-ro.”

In this film, when two samurai sword masters Ttsubaki san ju-ro (played by Toshiro Mifune) and Muroto Han-bei (played by Tatsuya Nakadai) faced against each other, there was a moment of long silence. They were absolutely equal in their power and they knew one movement leads to the decisive blow. There was a beauty of “balance and tension”. Once a perfect balance reached to climax, the silence ended with a flash of a sword and splash of bloods. When this was shown in America, there was a standing ovation in the theater. The silence was the most talkative motion in the film, without that scene the film never accomplished the admiration.

BUGAKU is a new style of Japanese dance art, which is a refined fusion of the subtle and profound beauty of NOH and the active of silence in BUJUTSU.

Finally, I would like to explain about BUGAKUZA which was established to widely spread the understanding of BUGAKU.

Since it was established, BUGAKUZA invited to Yasukuni Shrine, Ikuta Shrine and many other shrines and temples to perform dedicatory dance. Also BUGAKUZA was invited to perform in Museums, NOH stages, Fuji Rock Festival and many performances in foreign countries such as London, Paris, Firenze, Brussels and Jerusalem.

I especially remember the performance in Firenze. BUGAKUZA held performance at
Basilica di Santa Croce (Lecce), where Giotto di Bondone gave all he had in his skill of creation and it is the final resting place of Michelangelo and Galileo. Performing with timeless masters of history inspired me and gave me chance to grow.

I am still on the way to perfect BUGAKU. It is a growing art. As an originator of a new style in traditional art, I feel it is my duty to make BUGAKU known to world. For that reason, as well as to be a best performer, I devote myself to be a best teacher of BUGAKU. Please enjoy a new expression of Japanese dance art BUGAKU with us.
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武の意義と本質





「武」という字の由来は、「二」「戈」「止」の三つの文字の組み合わせによる「二つの戈(ほこ)を止める」と言う会意文字であるとする説が知られています。

二千年前の書物『春秋左氏伝』には「それ武は功を定め、兵をおさむ。ゆえに戈を止むるを武となす」という楚の荘王の言葉があります。後漢の許慎は『説文解字』の中で「武とは撫(ぶ)なり、止戈(しか)なり。禍乱を鎮撫するなり。禍乱を平定して人道の本(もと)に復せしめ、愛撫統一することが武の本義なり」と説いています。この解釈は、荘王及び許慎の願い、もしくは機智によるところかも知れません。武という文字本来の起源としては賛否ありますが、日本に漢字が伝来する以前に遡るこの解釈が、結果的に日本の武士の発生、武道の精神の形成に影響したことは十分に想像できます。

また、西暦六〇三年に聖徳太子が制定した、我が国最初の成文法である『一七条憲法』には、その第一条に「和を以って貴しとなす」とあります。こちらも意見が分かれますが、和を貴ぶ精神は日本人に根付いています。

柳生新陰流の柳生宗矩(一五七一〜一六四六)は「敵をよせぬ心地」を流儀の根幹としています。山鹿素行(一六二二〜一六八五)は泰平の世における武士の役割を論じ、文武両道をわきまえ、武士がまず世の中の模範とならなければならないとした。「武士道というは死ぬことと見つけたり」の一文で知られる『葉隠』の山本常朝(一六五九〜一七一九)は、武士にとって最も大事なことは死の覚悟と説いています。覚悟とは悟りを覚えると書きます。死を覚悟したとき、人生の小事は削ぎ落とされ、真の大義を知ると私は考えます。元禄から享保にかけて活躍した軍学者、大道寺友山(一六三九〜一七三〇)は『武道初心集』に「義」こそ武士道の本質あるいは中核をなすものであると論じています。

『武士道』を世界に紹介した新渡戸稲造は、武士道とは武士が守るべき道徳的徳目の作法とし、格言「負けるが勝ち」「血を見ない勝利こそ最善の勝利」を示して、武人の究極の理想は平和であると書いています。

現代にも馴染み深いところでは、近代柔道創始者、嘉納治五郎の言葉に「自他共栄」とあります。極真空手・大山倍達は「力なき正義は無能なり。正義なき力は暴力なり」と言っています。また、少林寺拳法開祖・宗道臣は「武道の本質は、修行鍛錬する事を通じて精神と肉体と健全なる自己を確立すると共に、社会的にも積極的に不正や悪と戦ってゆける勇気と行動力を持った人間を作って行く『人づくり』の大道です」としています。

私たち武楽座でも、「武」の本義は争いを止め、平和を守る事と捉え、真の武士は「和」のために闘うものと定義しています。


 
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